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La Pendulerie

Rare Gilt Bronze and White Marble Mantel Clock “Love Crowned by the Graces”, Louis XVI period

Coteau

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Charles-Cécile Filon
Enamel Dial by Joseph Coteau
Rare Gilt Bronze and White Marble Mantel Clock
“Love Crowned by the Graces”
Paris, Louis XVI period, circa 1785
Height: 65 cm; width 51 cm

Provenance: In chased and gilt bronze, the white marble partially painted with polychrome motifs, the white enamel dial, indicating the hours, minutes, seconds and the date, signed “Filon À PARIS” and “́COTEAU” in the lower portion under the bezel, set in an urn that is surmounted by a flower bouquet and flanked by two nymphs and a putto, the base with a central curved and slightly protruding section, features a bas relief frieze depicting putti at an altar of Love, flanked by painted polychrome flower swags. The clock is raised upon toupie feet.
A similar clock, formerly in the collection of Pascal Izarn, is illustrated in P. Kjellberg, Encyclopédie de la Pendule Française du Moyen Age au XXe siècle, Paris, 1997, p. 256, pl. D. Another was sold by Christies New York, Segoura collection, on October 19, 2006, lot 443 ($ 60.000).
Most of the other known models feature gilt bronze bas-reliefs instead of painted marble. This is the case for the example in the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, which is illustrated in Tardy, La Pendule Française, vol. II, p. 250 fig. 1. A further example is in the Château of Fontainebleau.
Bibliography:
Tardy, La Pendule Française, Vol. II, p. 250 fig. 1 H. Ottomeyer / P. Proschel et al., Vergoldete Bronzen, Munich, 1986, Vol. I, p. 250 fig. 4.6.18 P. Kjellberg, Encyclopédie de la Pendule Française du Moyen Age au XXe siècle, Paris, 1997, p. 256 pl. D

Charles-Cécile Filon became a master in 1751; his workshop was located in the rue de la Grande Truanderie from 1751 to 1774. Due to his excellent reputation and widespread fame, he was chosen to construct the movement of a regulator invented by Passemant, which stood in the Duke de Choiseul’s study in the Château de Chanteloup (see J-D. Augarde, Les ouvriers du Temps, Genève, 1996, p. 383, fig. 280). During the 18th century, certain of his pieces were mentioned in the probate inventories of lawyer and art collector Nicolas-Philippe de Rebergues, and that of banker Joseph Duruey.

Joseph Coteau (1740-1801) came from Geneva but worked in Paris, where he was established in the rue Poupée, St. André des Arts ; he became a maître in 1778. In 1780 he was appointed Peintre-émailleur du roi et de la Manufacture Royale de Porcelaine de Sèvres ; over the next few years he did piece-work there while working as an independent painter in Paris, specializing in enamel watchcases and clock dials. By 1784 he was no longer working for Sèvres and continued to supply fine dials, plaques and enamel cases to important Parisian clockmakers.

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